READING WALLACE STEVENS IS LIKE…

Scarriet

Here’s how the game works.

Let’s start with Homer. 

Reading Homer is like...You are 22.  It is mid-summer.  You are playing the board game Risk with young and old family members, drinking ouzo, eating lamb on a large, open-air porch.

Reading Wallace Stevens is like…You are 60.  It is fall.  You are squeezed into a little uptown Manhattan jazz club, slightly buzzed, but hungry.  An elegant stranger looks you up and down and it seems they are going to speak to you, but they only end up giving you a snooty look, and turn away…

Reading John Ashbery is likeYou are 20.  You are talking to your favorite English teacher in a bar who you happened to run into by accident, for the first time outside of school.  You are drunk on 2 drinks; he seems sober on 12.  He’s really cool, and he sure can talk, but you keep waiting for him to…

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WE HAVE TO GO BAAACK

the illustration of a. fienemann

Just re-watched the Lost season 5 finale tonight.  2 weeks left until the season 6 premiere.  So excited!  Anyway, I drew this a while ago – just a fan comic about the season 3 finale.  The last line just lends itself to hilarity.

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Three Guys One Book on Harriet the Spy

Three Guys One Book on Harriet the Spy

Something’s off with the comments section on TG1B, so this is what I wanted to say:

Three points:

 

First, Fitzhugh wrote two sequels which I’ve never read: The Long Secret and Sport (there are also sequels by other writers but I’m not interested in those).

 

Second, one of the best bits about Harriet the Spy I’ve read compared it to, among other titles, John Le Carré’s A Perfect Spy as a thematic equivalent, almost a childhood version. 

 

Third, as is obvious, I loved this book, so thanks for writing about it here!

Aphorisms from Mark Leidner, whose Beauty Was The Case That They Gave Me I loved.

THERMOS

This month, poet and old friend of THERMOS Mark Leidner has published a book of aphorisms, called The Angel in the Dream of Our Hangover. Put out by Sator Press— a self-made pay-what-you-will indie publisher— the book is available right now. Go get it! Here’s a selection of work from inside:



the purpose of love is to gain so much of one person’s trust, that when they are dying you can tell them it will be okay, and they will believe you



the period of time beginning halfway into the previous second, and ending halfway through the next, is what is known as the “fiscal second”



early on in his career, the poet sold his soul; he then spent the rest of his life trying to redeem it; as a result, he was highly motivated, and all of his ambition was sincere



missing someone is like what the…

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BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

balls

Bad news, Brevity fans.  You aren’t going to win the lottery**, a fact made clear in Eric LeMay’s addictive essay in Diagram 11.5 and in Hannah Ensor’s appreciation of LeMay’s essay found on the Essay Daily Advent Calendar.  Here is Ensor on LeMay’s essay (which is indeed a Flash essay, but of a different kind):

LOSING THE LOTTERY … does some fancy interactive computer stuff alongside more classic essay things. It starts by asking you to choose six numbers from among floating gray lottery balls. Once you do, you enter the essay: split into two parts, the essay sections (49 in all and, besides the first, randomly presented) on the left and on the right a computer-generated simulation of lottery results: using the six numbers you chose, it simulates winnings and costs based on buying a hundred $1 Ohio Classic Lotto tickets every second. Which, for the record, would be a lot…

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Is this my favorite Michael Robbins poem? It’s hard to say because I pretty much like all of them. But this is probably what I’d recommend to first-time readers, even if it’s the last poem in his collection.

This month for Poetry 365 we’re highlighting Michael Robbins’ defiantly inventive debut  Alien vs. Predator.  Described as “equal parts hip-hop, John Berryman, and capitalism seeking death and not finding it,” these 55 strange, darkly funny poems are as impressive for their formal precision as they are for their frenzied name checking of everyone from Auden, Frost, and Yeats to Nirvana, Star Wars, and M*A*S*H.  So check out this University of Chicago grad’s brave new collection, sample a poem below, and make sure to stop back next month for Poetry 365.

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